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I had the pleasure of attending Cloudera’s recent analyst summit. Presenters reviewed the work the company has done since its founding six years ago and outlined its plans to use Hadoop to further empower big data technology to support what I call information optimization. Cloudera’s executive team has the co-founders of Hadoop who worked at Facebook, Oracle and Yahoo when they developed and used Hadoop. Last year they brought in CEO Tom Reilly, who led successful organizations at ArcSight, HP and IBM. Cloudera now has more than 500 employees, 800 partners and 40,000 users trained in its commercial version of Hadoop. The Hadoop technology has brought to the market an integration of computing, memory and disk storage; Cloudera has expanded the capabilities of this open source software for its customers through unique extension and commercialization of open source for enterprise use. The importance of big data is undisputed now: For example, our latest research in big data analytics finds it to be very important in 47 percent of organizations. However, we also find that only 14 percent are very satisfied with their use of big data, so there is plenty of room for improvement. How well Cloudera moves forward this year and next will determine its ability to compete in big data over the next five years.

Cloudera’s technology supports what it calls an enterprise data hub (EDH), vr_Big_Data_Analytics_04_types_of_big_data_for_analyticswhich ties together a series of integrated components for big data that include batch processing, analytic SQL, a search engine, machine learning, event stream processing and workload management; this is much like the way relational databases and tools evolved in the past. These features also can deal with the types of big data most often used, according to our research: 40 percent or more use five types, from transactional data (60%) to machine data (42%). Hadoop combines layers of the data and analytics stack from collection, staging and storage to data integration and integration with other technologies. For its part Cloudera has a sophisticated focus on both engineering and customer support. Its goal is to enable enterprise big data management that can connect and integrate with other data and applications from its range of partners. Cloudera also seeks to facilitate converged analytics. One of these partners, Zoomdata, demonstrated the potential of big data analytics in analytic discovery and exploration through its visualization on the Cloudera platform; its integrated and interactive tool can be used by business people as well as professionals in analytics, data management and IT.

Cloudera latest major release with Cloudera Enterprise 5 brought a range of enterprise advancements from in-memory processing, vr_Big_Data_Analytics_11_implementing_analytics_through_hadoopresource management, data management, data protection to name a few. Cloudera offers a range of product options that they announced to make it easier to embrace their Hadoop technology. Cloudera Express is its free version of Hadoop, and it provides three editions licensed through subscription: basic, flex and data hub. The Flex Edition of Cloudera Enterprise has support for analytic SQL, search, machine learning, event stream processing and online NoSQL through the Hadoop components HBase, Impala, Spark and Navigator; a customer organization can have one of these per Hadoop cluster. The Enterprise Data Hub (EDH) Edition enables use of any of the components in any configuration. Cloudera Navigator is a product for managing metadata, discovery and lineage, and in 2014 it will add search, annotation and registration on metadata. Cloudera uses Apache Hive to support SQL through HiveQL, and Cloudera Impala provides a unique interface to the Hadoop file system HDFS using SQL. This is in line with what our research shows organizations prefer: More than half (52%) use standard SQL to access Hadoop. This range of choices in getting to data within Hadoop helps Cloudera’s customers realize a broad range of uses that include predictive customer care, market risk management, customer experience and other areas where very large volumes of information can be applied for applications that were not cost-effective before. With EDH Edition Cloudera can compete directly with large players IBM, Oracle, SAS and Teradata, all of which have ambitions to provide the hub of big data operations for enterprises.

Having open source roots, community is especially important to Hadoop. vr_Big_Data_Analytics_07_dissatisfaction_with_big_data_analyticsPart of building a community is providing training to certify and validate skills. Cloudera has enrolled more than 50,000 professionals in its Cloudera University and works with online learning provider Udacity to increase the number of certified Hadoop users. It also has developed academic relationships to promote Hadoop skills being taught to computer science students. Our research finds that this sort of activity is necessary: The most common challenge in big data analytics processes for two out of three (67%) organizations is not having enough skilled resources; we have found similar issues in the implementation and management of big data. The other aspect of a community is to enlist partners that offer specific capabilities. I am impressed with Cloudera’s range of partners, from OEMs and system integrators to channel resellers such as Cisco, Dell, HP, NetApp and Oracle to support in the cloud from Amazon, IBM, Verizon and others.

To help it keep up Cloudera announced it has raised another $160 million from the likes of T. Rowe Price, Michael Dell Ventures and Google Ventures to add to financing from venture capital firms. With this funding Cloudera outlined its investment focus for 2014 which will concentrate on advancing database and storage, security, in-memory computing and cloud deployment. I believe that it will need to go further to meet the growing needs for integration and analytics and prove that it can provide a high-value integrated offering directly as well as through partners. Investing in its Navigator product also is important, as our research finds that quality and consistency of data is the most challenging aspect of the big data analytics process in 56 percent of organizations. At the same time, Cloudera should focus on optimizing its infrastructure for the four types of data discovery that are required according to our analysis.

Cloudera’s advantage is being the focal point in the Hadoop ecosystem while others are still trying to match its numbers in developers and partners to serve big data needs. Our research finds substantial growth opportunity here: Hadoop will be used in 30 vr_Info_Optimization_12_big_data_is_widely_usedpercent of organizations through 2015 and another 12 percent are planning to evaluate it. Our research also finds a significant lead for Cloudera in Hadoop distributions, but other options like Hortonworks and MapR are growing. The research finds that the most of these organizations are seeking the ability to respond faster to opportunities and threats; to do that they will need to have a next generation of skills to apply to big data projects. Our research in information optimization finds that over half (56%) of organizations are planning to use big data and Hadoop will be a key focus for those efforts. Cloudera has a strong position in the expanding big data market because it focuses on the fundamentals of information management and analytics through Hadoop. But it faces stiff competition from the established providers of RDBMSs and data appliances that are blending Hadoop with their technology as well as from a growing number of providers of commercial versions of Hadoop. Cloudera is well managed and has finances to meet these challenges; now it needs to be able to show many high-value production deployments in 2014 as the center of business’s big data strategies. If you are building a big data strategy with Hadoop, Cloudera must be in the evaluation priority for an organization.

Regards,

Mark Smith

CEO & Chief Research Officer

At Oracle’s recent cloud computing analyst summit in sunny Palm Springs, the company’s executive team insisted that it sees clear skies for its efforts in cloud computing. The summit was led vr_BTI_importance_of_cloud_computingby senior executive Thomas Kurian, who runs the entire product organization and reports directly to CEO Larry Ellison. He affirmed that Oracle intends to offer the full range of cloud computing – public, private and hybrid models – to its customers and partners. As one of the world’s largest software suppliers Oracle has much at stake to make its database and all tools and applications available in these cloud environments, including managed cloud services. Our business technology innovation research shows this is a smart bet. Cloud computing is important or very important to 57 percent of organizations, and more than half (55%) of cloud users have been using it for more than a year. I noted in 2013 that simplifying IT and innovating in business are key to its software strategy, and Oracle’s efforts since then have executed on this outline.

Oracle has been developing a public cloud for some time, but in the last couple of years it sharpened its expertise and gained customers through acquisitions while refining its focus and investing in technology. Oracle now offers software as a service through its applications team covering HR, customer service, sales, marketing, ERP, finance, the supply chain and other areas. I recently assessed the Oracle HCM Cloud service, which provides a good example of what the company is doing and one that we awarded for 2013 Ventana Research Technology Innovation Award.

Oracle is determined to provide infrastructure as a service and elastic computing services for storage, identity verification, messaging and networking. Here it is competing directly against Amazon, IBM, Microsoft and others. Oracle also offers its platform as a service for using its database and tools in a variety of ways including the Web and mobile to collaborative methods. This strategy also includes analytics and big data. Our big data analytics research found 27 percent of organizations using cloud-based systems for this purpose, and it is gaining momentum as the preferred method of access: 22 percent prefer software as a service for big data analytics, 7 percent prefer a managed service, and 18 percent have no preference. Oracle is confident it can compete on price with other public cloud players. In addition its newest focus in the public cloud is information as a service, which brings corporate and public data together for business needs. Oracle is also strengthening its cloud computing marketplace so its software will be easy not only to access and purchase but also to onboard and use.

The private cloud computing area is somewhat different. CIOs need options to expand their compute power rapidly according to business needs; such a plan once had to be executed in the company’s data center, but now the cloud offers alternatives. In a more controlled manner than for the public cloud, Oracle provides the full life cycle of management through Oracle Enterprise Manager across its applications, platform, database and infrastructure, which can help most IT organizations simplify and reduce their focus on managing their infrastructure and enable them to focus on the value of the information and technology they provide for the business. Oracle offers multiple methods of deploying a private cloud: virtual machines for server consolidation, clustered databases for platform consolidation, and multitenant occupancy for database consolidation. Its private cloud platforms can provide a range of computing services to support applications and even enterprise deployments for use of mobile technology.

Oracle also offers a managed cloud service in which it builds and manages a private cloud environment similar to IT outsourcing except that Oracle owns the software being hosted. In this arrangement Oracle can provide in the cloud any of its applications, platform and infrastructure and can also connect to customers’ on-premises systems. Oracle says that more than 550 customers around the globe are using this service, processing 1.25 trillion business transactions per day; it stores more than 41 petabytes of data as well. In this offering Oracle competes directly with companies that have been offering this type of service in managed and outsourced approaches, including HP, Accenture and TCS. Oracle has been steadily building a strong position for its own outsourcing and managed approach to cloud computing.

These three cloud approaches have in common the Oracle database, running as a database as a service. Supporting it is the Oracle Fusion Middleware as a service that operates its business applications and is the basis to build custom applications by providing user, process, documents, information and identity services. Middleware is also where Oracle is advancing its support of mobile computing and big data as well as batch-to-real-time integration to applications and data across the enterprise and cloud along with Web services support through the REST and SOAP interfaces. Our research shows that integrating data from cloud applications is important to 80 percent of organizations. Oracle is releasing in the first part of 2014 more technology like Java, document and business intelligence as part of its Oracle Fusion Middleware as a service. Oracle has enlisted its Java technology to support the “as a service” concept to help move on-premises applications to the cloud but also to support application deployments. Oracle has worked to ensure its middleware can operate in the Microsoft Azure and Verizon Cloud services. Also part of middleware is the database as a service that is part of the Oracle cloud and of the compute service for elastic computing; it can be provisioned and used on a subscription or a usage basis; customers also can subscribe to backup as a service. Beneath the middleware and the database is the infrastructure as a service, which provides direct support for computing, storage, messaging, identity and notification services. Oracle supports integration of other cloud computing environments such as salesforce.com with its on-premises applications.

vr_ngbi_br_bi_deployment_preferences_updatedOracle also is expanding its presence in application-centric cloud deployments. For instance, its Oracle Business Intelligence Cloud service will be available in 2014; here it plans to provide a range of real-time and self-service analytics and integration of data from the cloud and on-premises systems. Oracle already has been supporting its own BI applications in the cloud, but this step will help it compete in a market where many options have been available for several years. Our next-generation BI research found a need for this in 2013, when 25 percent preferred software as a service for enterprise BI and nearly as many (22%) a hosted private cloud. It is even more important for mobile BI: 26 prefer cloud deployment, 30 percent chose hosted by supplier, and 36 percent had no preference; only 9 percent prefer on-premises for mobile BI. For another example, the Oracle Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service is now available, based on its Hyperion Planning software. In BI and planning in the cloud Oracle definitely is not first to market and indeed will have to catch up to build a brand and trust with customers in these areas.

Given its size, Oracle is uniquely positioned with server, database, vr_BTI_BR_top_benefits_of_cloud_computingplatform, tools and applications all operating in the cloud in public and private approaches and as a managed service. Only IBM is close to providing such an extensive software and technology stack. The competitive edge of preintegrating the entire stack in the cloud is a great position from which to grow its business. Our business technology innovation research finds that cloud computing has improved the availability of applications and information for business; one-third (34%) of organizations said it has improved availability significantly. In addition the research found that cloud computing has lowered costs, improved the efficiency of business processes, boosted communications and knowledge sharing, and increased productivity for more than one-third of organizations. The skies look clear and not cloudy for Oracle, which will be delivering more cloud computing on a very aggressive schedule throughout 2014 and 2015. If you are transitioning to or evaluating cloud computing in any manner, from infrastructure and platform to tools and business applications, Oracle is a provider you can’t ignore.

Regards,

Mark Smith

CEO & Chief Research Officer

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