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The importance of product information management (PIM) has become clear in recent years and especially as it relates to master data management. As I recently wrote handling this business process effectively and using capable software should be priorities for any organization in marketing and selling its products and services but also interconnecting the distributed supply chain. Our research on product information VentanaResearch_PIM_VI_2015management can help organizations save time and resources in efforts to ensure that product information is an asset to facilitate efficiency in many business processes. Through years of benchmarking, we have developed a blueprint for managing and improving product information. Using this approach enables companies to more effectively align and link their activities and processes. Of course achieving effectiveness also requires using applications that create consistent, reliable product information. We regularly update our Value Index for PIM to enable companies to evaluate vendors and their applications’ suitability for use in all business processes requiring product information.

The Ventana Research Value Index methodology evaluates application vendors and their products in seven categories. Five are product-related, assessing usability, manageability, reliability, capability and adaptability, while two quantify the customer assurance issues of vendor validation and total cost of ownership and return on investment (TCO/ROI). The Ventana Research Value Index: Product Information Management in 2015 is the distillation of a year of market and product research by analysts at Ventana Research, the premier benchmark research and advisory services firm. Built on a foundation of 12 years of business and technology research, this unbiased, fact-based index is the first such industry undertaking to assess the value of software designed specifically for enabling product information management.

The Value Index for Product Information Management in 2015 reveals insights into the state of the software market for PIM. It investigates the divide between vendors that are independently focused on this category – Agility Multichannel, Enterworks, Informatica, Riversand and Stibo Systems – and larger ones that embed it in a business application suite – IBM, Oracle and SAP. A third group in­clud­ing ADAM Software and WebOn specializes in a departmental approach to PIM; these companies also are expanding from their European bases to market and sell in North America.

The Value Index analysis identifies two companies, Stibo Systems and Informatica, as the current leaders in PIM; Stibo vr_PIM_2015_Weighted_OverallSystems outscored Informatica by only 0.2 percent. Stibo Systems is rated Hot and ranks first in four of the seven evaluation categories (Usability, Capability, Validation and TCO/ROI); Informatica, also Hot overall, leads in the other three categories (Manageability, Reliability and Adaptability). A primary distinction between the two is that Stibo Systems dedicates its focus to this particular business process and applications while Informatica, through its acquisition of Heiler Software, has integrated PIM software with its own data infrastructure including master data management, data integration, data quality and other key tools. One of the insights resulting from our PIM Value Index analysis is that each of these vendors would benefit from paying attention to the other’s strengths.

Agility Multichannel is the third-ranked vendor for PIM, also rated Hot overall. Making advances in Usability, Reliability, Capability, Validation and TCO/ROI and also in Adaptability through an OEM agreement with Pentaho for integration and analytics, it has dramatically improved its offering in the market. Deeper support for commerce also strengthens its independent approach to PIM. A close fourth is Riversand, another Hot vendor, which continues to advance in many of the categories, particularly Usability and TCO/ROI.

Enterworks finished a strong fifth and is rated Hot overall. Its recent acquisition by Black Dragon Capital and appointment of a new CEO should bring renewed vigor to its market efforts. SAP, ranked sixth and rated Hot, acquired PIM vendor hybris software and entered the market with new marketing and commerce applications that have embedded product content management. SAP also provides data management and related tools to support PIM. Seventh-place WebOn improved from Warm to Hot overall. It has expanded its efforts to North America and made improvements in Usability; its specialty areas are sales and commerce where PIM is not as easily available or integrated with existing processes and systems.

Oracle moved up to eighth place and now is rated Hot. It has improved its PIM offering, particularly in how it supports existing customers and with an interface to applications through its Product Hub and data management technology. Offering PIM independently is its largest challenge, and the Warm rating for Validation and TCO/ROI make it more difficult for potential customers to consider its offering. ADAM Software here makes its initial entry into the Value Index; though it is rated Warm overall, it earned the Hot rating in three categories. It focuses on marketing departments, which often need help in managing product information. Finally, IBM struggles to support PIM as a business application. Its focus is on master data management and associated data integration and quality, and it is rated Warm in support for PIM.

The 2015 Product Information Management Value Index has advanced from the previous version in two major respects. First, we increased the specificity of the characteristics we evaluated in Usability, Manageability, Reliability and Adaptability to be able to differentiate the products better. Second, we increased the number of items in the Capabilities section to reflect the growing need for PIM to provide more depth for both business and IT users. This resulted in lower scores for some vendors in some categories, but others made improvements to their products in the past two years. For example, Agility Multichannel’s score rose significantly, but IBM, which has not made much investment to PIM, remained in last place. Other vendors such as Tibco were invited multiple times but did not respond and were left out of the analysis. Other specialized and vertical application providers such as JDA were left out because they did not meet the evaluation criteria. Still other vendors were acquired, such as GXS by OpenText, and became more focused on providing integration technology; lacking a dedicated focus on PIM they were excluded.

I urge organizations to do a thorough job of evaluating product information management systems and associated applications, tools and information technology. To help we offer this Value Index as both the results of our in-depth analysis of these vendors and as an evaluation methodology. The Value Index can be used to evaluate existing suppliers and also provides evaluation criteria for new projects; applying it thus can shorten the RFP cycle time. It also will eliminate wasted time in traditional evaluations along with the number of resources required to assess and optimize your product related processes with PIM.

Unlike many IT analyst firms that rank vendors from an IT-only perspective, or focus too much on master data management and data infrastructure, Ventana Research has designed the Value Index to provide a balanced perspective of vendors and products that is rooted in an understanding of business drivers and needs. This approach not only reduces cost and time but also minimizes the risk of making a decision that is bad for the business. Using the Value Index will enable your organization to achieve the levels of efficiency and effectiveness needed to optimize product information management. I invite you to learn more about how it can help.


Mark Smith

CEO & Chief Research Officer

All lines of business are under pressure to meet targets and deliver expected results, but none is under more pressure than Sales. Like other organizations it must use information to derive insights about progress and problems and to decide what changes to make. Today businesses collect and analyze data from more data sources in more forms than ever before. To understand it they need effective analytics, and again none need it more than Sales.

Analytics applied to sales data can deliver significant value. VentanaResearch_NGSA_BenchmarkResearchIt can help sales organizations reach quotas, forecast more accurately and make better decisions about activities and strategy. However, selecting the right tools for analytics can be difficult. People charged with identifying those tools often don’t understand the specific needs of sales groups or the full scope of evaluation criteria required for successful deployment and use.

In the past, and often still today, many sales organizations did not invest directly in analytics, instead using desktop spreadsheets, cutting data and charts from applications and reports and pasting it into presentations. In addition organizations have tried to stretch applications designed for other purposes, such as sales force automation (SFA) and customer relationship management (CRM), to provide reports on accounts and opportunities, but these systems address only some sales activities and lack complete information about customers. They need more purpose-built tools to examine sales performance in core processes such as the sales pipeline, forecasts, configuration pricing and quoting, proposals, quotas, compensation and incentives, and coaching of personnel. Used properly analytics can provide insights on all of these. But to select tools that cover all these areas, prospective users of sales analytics must be able to understand the available options and identify the capabilities that will serve them best. Should they be simple or complex? One-time or continuously used? Historical or forward-looking? In addition the tools should be easy to use and able to make data readily available. Several of our benchmark research studies demonstrate the need for effective analytics in this critical business area of sales.

The expanding use of sales analytics stems from increased attention to performance across sales processes (particularly because of the importance of sales in revenue and financial planning to meet customer demand with products and services). In sales planning, the need for quick analysis and review of actuals vs. plan is the management capability most often important (for 73%) for organizations participating in our next-generation business planning benchmark research. Many sales initiatives have failed to live up to their potential because companies did not use the right analytics tools and approaches to plan and operate them. For example, measuring the wrong things, measuring the right things the wrong way or using only partial data to measure will have negative (and often unintended) consequences. That’s because sales decisions almost always must be made in a constrained environment, in which virtually every important decision requires trade-offs (such as price against volume). To be useful, analytics must recognize trade-offs and provide guidance to help decision-makers choose those that are aligned not only with the company’s overall objectives but also with its customer, financial and sales profitability goals. Sales analytics also can support new approaches such as sales contests and gamification that motivate employees to perform better.

Analytics also is a key tool for devising, tracking and revising measures and metrics for sales processes that enable managers to make better-informed decisions faster and more consistently. Sales operations managers and executives need advice on selecting the analytics most useful for them and choosing sales metrics and performance indicators. This applies to the various kinds of analytics that sales organizations need. For example, our research finds that analytics is a priority for sales compensation management, where it is the top technology trend in 84 percent of organizations, and for sales forecasting (in 79% of organizations).

At this level of complexity sales organizations cannot continue to make do with outmoded tools. While spreadsheets are comfortable and familiar, when used for collaborative enterprise tasks they fall short in many areas such as lacking control of calculations and introducing inconsistent or erroneous data. Our research in sales compensation management finds that those that use them universally for this purpose are not satisfied with their analytics tools more often (in more than two-thirds of organizations) than those that use more capable tools.

A new generation of technologies offers more powerful and flexible sales analytics. Big data systems for processing and storing data have evolved quickly, making it possible for sales organizations to extract insights from masses of data for practical purposes. For example, visual discovery can present data in quickly graspable forms, and simplifying the presentation of key sales indicators and metrics in dashboards can put necessary information at the fingertips of nontechnical executives and managers. Advances in mobile technology enable access to analytics from smartphones and tablets, helping users on the go decide what to do next. Making sales applications and data available through cloud computing also facilitates access to and use of sales analytics. In addition collaboration enables sales teams to communicate and coordinate operations and managers and sales reps to plan more effectively. And predictive analytics enables users to look forward to anticipate trends and plan ahead rather than merely react.

Analyzing these advances and their impacts on sales organizations now and in the near future, we have released new benchmark research on the next generation of sales analytics. It examines the use of and intentions for analytics and metrics involved in sales-related activities. It uses the Ventana Research Performance Index Model® to assess the productivity and performance of organizations by size and industry. A major aim of this research is to provide understanding of the need for and potential of advanced tools to help set a business case for investing in sales analytics. It assesses the impacts of these next-generation technologies in facilitating faster, easier and broader use of sales analytics. It follows up on previous research that shows that inconsistent execution and scattered information continue to motivate investment in about half of sales organizations and explores how advanced analytics can help remedy these issues.

Our mission in this new research is to uncover the best vr_SF12_07_impediments_in_sales_motivate_investmentpractices companies use in measuring the performance of sales-related activities, the challenges they face and how they intend to improve their situations in the coming years. Sales analytics is a required component for any successful use of SFA to applications and activities individually or as part of sales performance management. It examines in detail issues in collecting data from a diverse set of sources that are critical for creating and maintaining useful sales metrics and indicators. It explores how data sources are reconciled through data preparation and then analyzed to produce the information sales people require to support decisions that impact their bottom line, market share and other aspects of their strategic objectives. Increasing the accuracy, confidence and timeliness of sales analytics is critical to every activity in sales, and those without a dedicated approach designed to assist sales will find themselves at a disadvantage. Sales analytics is a key resource for sales organizations facing today’s unprecedented challenges, as I recently outlined in our Sales Research Agenda for 2015. If you are responsible for sales activities or systems and want to see where the present and the future lie, please consult our research on the next generation of sales analytics.



CEO and Chief Research Officer

Mark Smith – Twitter

Ventana Research

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